The Village at Squaw Valley® Celebrates Third Annual Art, Wine and Music Festival

Squaw Valley Art & Wine Festival

Squaw Valley bursts with color, taste and sound as two-day fundraising festival brings together fine artists, craftsmen, performers and musicians

[Olympic Valley, Calif.] June 23, 2016 – The Village at Squaw Valley announces the return of the popular Art, Wine and Music Festival July 9-10, where Squaw Valley will host the annual two-day event celebrating artists, craftsmen, performers and musicians. The Art, Wine & Music Festival features wine tasting from California wineries, three performance stages with live music, and restaurants, shops, and walkways lined with fine art booths and exhibits. All proceeds from the event benefit Achieve Tahoe whose mission is to provide affordable inclusive physical and recreational activities that build health and confidence. Last year’s festival raised over $15,000 for Achieve Tahoe. The festival will take place on Saturday, July 9-Sunday, July 10 from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. both days.

“We’re thrilled to see The Village come alive this July with the excitement of artists, musicians and wineries from across California,” said Caroline Ross, executive director for the Squaw Village Neighbourhood Company. “The Art, Wine and Music Festival is a vibrant gathering and we’re proud to partner with Achieve Tahoe, where all proceeds from the event will go toward providing adaptive sports and recreation resources for people with disabilities.”

Wine tasting will take place Saturday and Sunday from 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Participating California wineries include: Lumen Wine Co., Nuclear Wine Co., Spicy Vines, The Henry Wine Group and Wrath Winery.

Live musical performances featuring music genres from around the world will take place Saturday and Sunday from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Following is the complete music lineup:

Saturday, July 9

  • Main Street Stage
    • 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.: Mind X Duo
    • 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.: Piwai
    • 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.: Karamo Susso Band
  • First Street Stage
    • 12:15 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.: World Beatnix
    • 2:15 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.: World Beatnix
    • 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.: World Beatnix
  • Funitel Plaza Stage
    • 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.: Milton Merlos
    • 12:30 – 1:30 p.m.: Milton Merlos
    • 2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.: Milton Merlos

Sunday, July 10

  • Main Street Stage
    • 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.: Drinking with Clowns Duo
    • 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.: Boca Do Rio
    • 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.: Salt Petal
  • First Street Stage
    • 12:15 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.: New World Jazz Project
    • 2:15 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.: New World Jazz Project
    • 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.: New World Jazz Project
  • Funitel Plaza Stage
    • 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.: Justin Ancheta
    • 12:30 – 1:30 p.m.: Justin Ancheta
    • 2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.: Justin Ancheta

Aerial Tram rides at Squaw Valley
Aerial Tram rides run daily through September 5 and on weekends only September 10 through October 3, from 10:20 a.m. to 4:20 p.m., with the last download at 5 p.m. The Aerial Tram will be open with extended hours on Friday, September 30 through Sunday, October 2 for Spartan World Championship Weekend. For complete details on the Aerial Tram and to purchase tickets online and save $10, click here. As an added bonus, guests who hike up to High Camp earn a free Aerial Tram ride back to The Village.

About The Village at Squaw Valley®
The Village at Squaw Valley is a year-round destination in the heart of Squaw Valley, located in North Lake Tahoe. This European-inspired Village features five restaurants, all with outdoor seating, bars, and eateries along with a variety of boutiques and galleries. Condominium style suites are conveniently located for access to four season adventure including aerial tram rides to High Camp at 8200 feet, overlooking Lake Tahoe. The Village events plaza is home to a variety of outdoor activities and premier music festivals, including free outdoor movie nights and Bluesdays throughout the summer season. Visit squawalpine.com/lodging or call (866) 818-6963 to learn more.

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It’s time to get READY for wildfire!

There are things you can do right now to prepare your house to prevent fire.

We have experienced four years of drought conditions along with significant moisture this past winter leading to excessive grass growth which we anticipate will lead to an above average fire season.  Wildfires spread from the wildland to homes every year in California but there are things you can do now to help prevent it from destroying your home.

What does defensible space mean?

1. Lean, Clean and Green Zone.  A defensible space of 100 feet around your home is required by law.  Clearing an area 30 feet immediately surrounding your home is critical.  Remove flammable vegetation.

2.  Reduced Fuel Zone in the remaining 70 feetSpacing between plants improves the chance of stopping a wildfire before it destroys your home.

3.  Remove plants beneath trees.  These plants act like a ladder to the fire into the trees.

4.  Remove tree branches at least 6 feet off the ground.  This will prevent small ground fires from jumping into the trees.

5.  Move wood piles at least 30 feet from all structures.  Fires that get into these piles are difficult or impossible to stop the spread of fire to the home.

Other Tips:

A home checklist is available at Readyforwildfire.org under the defensible space tab, along with other valuable information.

Burning:  Currently there is a burn ban in effect.  Residential debris burning will not be allowed until we receive significant rainfall or snow later in the year.

Utilize the Green Bag program to remove debris from your yard or the landfill supplies a debris dumpster at a reduced cost, along with free trips to the landfill with yard waste, 6yd maximum

Hire a Defensible Space Contractor.  They are pros at quickly getting your yard READY and removing debris.

If you have any questions call Paul Spencer, Prevention Officer Truckee FIre Protection District 530-582-7850.

 

Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows Summer Events

[Olympic Valley, Calif.] June 16, 2016 – Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows is kicking off the summer season with a variety of new offerings for all ages to enjoy the resort’s high alpine beauty. At High Camp, new items include a lawn and play area, streamlined High Camp experience packages and a free Summer Music Series. A brand new Squaw Kids Adventure Camp launches June 17, and the resort has also added a Sunday Brunch series to its popular lineup of sustainable dining experiences. Wanderlust returns with added offerings for festival-goers including new yoga classes, meditative hikes and more.  For elite athletes and thrill seekers, the resort welcomes the Broken Arrow Sky Race for the first time June 18 – 19.

Enhanced High Camp Experience at 8,200 Feet
Surrounded with sun-drenched views of Lake Tahoe at 8,200 feet, Squaw Valley’s High Camp will offer three new packages for nature lovers and outdoor adventurers this summer. Accessible via the iconic Aerial Tram, the upper mountain experience includes High Camp Pool & Hot Tub, roller skating, a new lawn area with games and a play structure for kids, the recently-renovated Olympic Museum, miles of hiking and walking trails, 360 degree panoramic views, and countless activities.

•    The Sightseeing Package: includes Aerial Tram ride, access to Olympic Museum, hiking and walking trails, scenic observation deck, geocaching, disc golf, and a variety of free lawn games; $34/day advanced rate for adults 18+, $17/day advanced rate for youth 5-7, children four and under are free.
•    The Adventure Package: includes Aerial Tram ride, full access to High Camp Pool & Hot Tub, roller skating, disc golf, geocaching, hiking and walking trails, scenic observation deck, geocaching, and lawn games; $42/day advanced rate for adults 18+, $25/day advanced rate for youth 5-7, children four and under are free.
•    The Family Pass: the whole family can access the Aerial Tram and all High Camp activities including High Camp Pool & Hot tub and roller skate rentals with savings up to 30%; $119 for two adults and four kids.

High Camp Experience activities are open daily, June 17 through September 5. Click here for more information about High Camp activities and save $10 on advanced rate packages.

Summer Music Series and New Dining Experience at High Camp
High Camp will launch a Summer Music Series with free live music on the lawn Saturdays and Sundays in July and August from 12 p.m. to 3 p.m.  A total of 19 show dates will include a special free performance on Monday, July 4. Additionally, guests will enjoy offerings from High Camp’s Poolside Café, where the restaurant will offer a grilled menu from the outdoor BBQ with cocktail service to all loungers in the High Camp Pool and Hot Tub area.

Squaw Kids Adventure Camp – Friday through Monday, June 17-September 5
Launching this summer, the resort will operate a day camp out of the Squaw Kids facility for children ages 5-13 to unplug, explore and discover the extraordinary High Sierra. Activities will include the following: swimming, Aerial Tram rides, hiking, nature crafts, biking, map and compass class, roller skating, geo-caching, engineering Lego build/tech projects, disc golf, climbing wall, mini golf, lawn games, scavenger hunts, cooking class, yoga, flower press and tree recognition. The summer camp is scheduled to take place Fridays through Mondays June 17 through September 5 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Prices are $109/day with an advanced purchase and a regular rate of $129/day. For more information or to sign up, click here.

Sunday Brunches at Squaw Valley – Sundays July 3 – September 4
Executive Chef Tiffany Swan and the team at MTN ROOTS Food Trucks will add a new Sunday Brunch Series to its lineup of popular Farm to Table dining experiences. Perfect for foodies and health-conscious families, the series will take place on the KT Sundeck at Squaw Valley. Each buffet-style brunch will feature sustainable, regionally-sourced meals prepared by the MTN ROOTS Food Truck. A seasonal Bellini will be offered to guests 21 and over alongside brunch items such as summer vegetables, a seasonal frittata, crispy Neueske’s bacon and weekly specials sourced locally in partnership with the Tahoe Food Hub. Brunches will be held Sundays, July 3 through September 4 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more information or to make a reservation, click here.

New Events at Wanderlust – July 14 – 17
The largest yoga-lifestyle event in the world returns to Squaw Valley July 14-17, where the four-day event will celebrate yoga, meditation, music, nature and camaraderie in the pristine setting of the High Sierra. New this year is an unparalleled lineup of offerings to inspire, surprise and delight returning and first-time festival-goers. Following are highlights for this year’s new events.
•    Sonic Hikes: Six new hikes will offer musical accompaniment. After a meditative hike, attendees can choose to join Masood Ali Khan for kirtan in the woods or Magic Giant who will play a variety of stringed instruments. Elijah Raywill lead a walking meditation and sing, Garth Stevenson will play upright bass, and attendees will be serenaded by Jaya Lakshmi and Ananda with angelic voices, guitar and bansuri flute—all in stunning natural settings.
•    Acrovinyasa: Australians Claudine and Honza LaFond come to Squaw Valley for the first time to teach this unique practice that unites the elements of vinyasa, acroyoga and inversion training in both a solo and partner practice.
•    Ride Your Brainwaves: A new dynamic class will feature meditation using Muse, the brain-sensing headband. In this intimate class, guests will meditate with Muse immersed in the sounds of their mind. This transformation of mental activity into an ocean of sound allows observation of the wandering mind and discovery between intention and effort.

Click here to view the full schedule or to register.

Broken Arrow Skyrace – June 18-19
Squaw Valley will host the Broken Arrow Skyrace for the first time on June 18-19. The Broken Arrow Skyrace is an iconic race that encompasses more than just running – it is a true test of how fast runners can move through the mountains. Participants will start in Squaw Valley and race up mountain trails, scramble across ridgelines and up gullies, and speed through Tahoe’s forests. Participants can register for one of following three distances.
•    A 3-3.5 mile “VK” or vertical kilometer distance that gains approximately 3,200′ elevation
•    A 16.4 mile distance with over 6,000′ elevation gain
•    A 32.23 mile distance with over 11,000′ elevation gain

Click here for more information about Broken Arrow Skyrace or to register.

Warren Miller “Head to Squaw Video Contest”
Even during summertime, snow is on the brain at Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows. The resort has partnered with Warren Miller for the “Head to Squaw Video Contest.”  Voting is open now through August 29 for the public to choose the best video submission from a ski or snowboard athlete or cinematographer. The winner will land a pair of HEAD skis and the opportunity to film with Warren Miller Entertainment during a shoot for the legendary filmmaker’s 68th feature film at Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows during the 2016-17 season. Once voting is closed, the top four final videos will be judged by an elite panel of judgesincluding Squaw Valley athletes Jonny Moseley, JT Holmes and Jeremy Jones. The winner will be announced September 5. For complete information on the Head to Squaw Video Contest, click here.

Aerial Tram rides at Squaw Valley
Aerial Tram rides run daily through September 5 and on weekends only September 10 through October 3, from 10:20 a.m. to 4:20 p.m., with the last download at 5 p.m. The Aerial Tram will be open with extended hours on Friday, September 30 through Sunday, October 2 for Spartan World Championship Weekend. For complete details on the Aerial Tram and to purchase tickets online and save $10, click here. As an added bonus, guests who hike up to High Camp earn a free Aerial Tram ride back to The Village.
About Squaw Valley | Alpine Meadows
Voted 2016 ‘Best Ski Resort’ in North America by USA Today and 10Best Readers’ Choice, Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows is an internationally renowned mountain resort in North Lake Tahoe that spans over 6,000 skiable acres. The resort features slopeside lodging at The Village at Squaw Valley®, which bustles year round with nonstop events and nearly 60 bars, restaurants and boutiques. With an annual average of 450 inches of snowfall and 300 sunny days, Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows is known as the spring skiing capital as it provides one of the longest ski and snowboard seasons in Lake Tahoe. Over 65 percent beginner and intermediate terrain and 14 easy-to-navigate mountain zones welcome skiers and riders of all ability levels. Visit squawalpine.com or call 1.800.403.0206 to learn more.

Squaw Valley to host 2017 Women’s Alpine World Cup

World Cup ski racing returns to Squaw Valley for the first time since 1969, reigniting the resort’s Olympic and World Cup legacy

LINK TO OFFICIAL SQUAW VALLEY WORLD CUP WEBSITE & MEDIA KIT

OLYMPIC VALLEY, CA (June 10, 2016) – The International Ski Federation (FIS) and the U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association (USSA) announced today that Squaw Valley will host an Audi FIS World Cup in March 2017, consisting of a women’s giant slalom on Friday, March 10 and a women’s slalom on Saturday, March 11. The event will mark the return of World Cup ski racing to California for the first time in 19 years. The World Cup will bring Olympic champions like Mikaela Shiffrin and Squaw Valley’s own Julia Mancuso to compete on the legendary Red Dog run, which also played host to the ladies’ slalom and giant slalom events at the 1969 World Cup and 1960 Winter Olympics. With the 2017 season culminating in the Audi FIS Ski World Cup Finals in Aspen, Colorado, the USSA had a unique opportunity to schedule an additional women’s World Cup weekend in the U.S. following Olympic test events in PyeongChang, South Korea. The addition of Squaw Valley and Killington, VT to the calendar will total 16 World Cup events hosted in the U.S. in the 2016-17 race season, the second highest ever.

“As a mountain community, we are hosting this event to inspire the next generation of ski racers,” said Andy Wirth, president and CEO of Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows. “There is nothing like watching a group of young athletes standing there in the finish corral looking up and truly being motivated by the best athletes in the world. With 1,500 kids in our race program and countless others in the region, this is the stage we must set for them to achieve their goals, in ski racing or otherwise.”

“I’m also proud to designate Kyle Crezee as our World Cup Committee Chair for this event,” continued Wirth. “Crezee is our Events Director here at Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows, and he has paved the way for the World Cup by hosting major events like U.S. Nationals. He is passionate about propelling our ski racing heritage into the future.”

Built on the legacy of the 1960 Winter Olympics hosted at Squaw Valley, the resort has since reared celebrated athletes such as Jonny Moseley, Julia Mancuso, Travis Ganong, Marco Sullivan, JT Holmes, Michelle Parker, Cody Townsend, Jeremy Jones, Ralph Backstrom, Nate Holland, and Errol Kerr.

“Growing up at Squaw Valley, I have been hoping for the return of the World Cup for a long time, and now we have the chance to show the world that our Olympic legacy is very much alive,” said Olympic champion and Squaw Valley native Julia Mancuso. “The terrain at Squaw Valley is what raised me as a skier, and I know that when my peers stand on top of the course on Red Dog they will see what competitors saw in 1960 and 1969: one of the most challenging courses in the world. So many of today’s racers have trained and competed on Red Dog in the past, and now we can see this legendary venue re-emerge onto the world stage.”

Squaw Valley’s addition to the schedule is part of a broad initiative by the USSA to raise the profile of alpine ski racing in America. Last year’s World Championships in Vail/Beaver Creek attracted record U.S. television audiences with live coverage on NBC and NBCSN, plus a global reach of 800 million. The Audi FIS Ski World Cup Finals in Aspen will also attract a large global audience. The USSA has taken the opportunity to incorporate new venues including a Nov. 25-26, 2016 women’s giant slalom and slalom in Killington, VT, plus the annual men’s December World Cup events in Beaver Creek, CO. With Squaw Valley added to the calendar, the USA has 16 Audi FIS Ski World Cup events in America next season, the second highest ever.

“Bringing the FIS Alpine World Cup to four different sites this season will continue to grow the visibility of alpine ski racing in America,” said USSA President and CEO Tiger Shaw. “Squaw Valley has partnered with the USSA to host many events and, with a strong Olympic legacy and a world-class venue, they are a welcome addition to the World Cup circuit. It’s a great opportunity for our stars, including Squaw Valley local Julia Mancuso, to race in front of their hometown crowd ahead of the World Cup finals.”

The Red Dog race venue was also the host of the 2014 Nature Valley U.S. Alpine Championships, attracting large crowds of kids who came to see their favorite ski racing stars. Mikaela Shiffrin, the current reigning Olympic slalom champion, took the giant slalom gold in the 2014 event and returned to the Red Dog course in April of this year to train with fellow athletes from the U.S. women’s team.

“Red dog is an awesome slope, the hill itself is super challenging and fun to ski,” said Mikaela Shiffrin. “The middle section has a lot of terrain variation: a break over, fall-aways, side hills, and bank turns. You have to be able to really attack the course. By the time you hit the pitch, which is one of the longest sustained pitches on the world cup besides Sölden, you are already 45 seconds into the run and your legs are burning. Then you come over the break over and you can see the finish and your thinking ‘oh man, I’m not even close! Okay here we go!’ I feel incredibly thankful to have trained a few days on Red Dog this spring to get a feel for the terrain. Red Dog is the kind of hill where the more you ski it the better you can balance being tactically smart and attacking at the same time, so while knowing what to expect won’t make it any easier, it will help me find that balance.”

“I am really excited about having another world cup weekend in the U.S.,” continued Shiffrin. “These past few years have been huge for ski racing in America with World Championships in Vail and Aspen, and now Killington and Squaw Valley coming up. I’m so psyched that mountains are taking interest in hosting races. It’s no small task but it’s spreading the word about our awesome sport and drumming up more excitement!”

The Red Dog Giant slalom course begins at 7,520 feet at the top of Snow King Peak, descending 1,267 feet before the finish at 6,252 feet at the base area of Squaw Valley. The slalom course will be sited on the lower portion of the same course, dropping 656 vertical feet from its start on Lower Dog Leg. Both courses feature challenging steeps and fall-away pitches on the notorious “Dog Leg” section of the course, the lower part of which lies in plain sight of the finish and spectator viewing area.

“Squaw is probably going to be the most difficult GS on the tour next year for the ladies,” said Atle Skårdal, FIS chief race director for the ladies’ Alpine World Cup. “It is a very, very technical and difficult hill, which we’re excited about. It seems to be a really keen organizing committee that is proactive in developing something memorable for everybody. Like Killington, it’s not a long-term deal with Squaw for the moment, but you don’t know what’s going to happen in the future. The production of a really great event has to be the motivation for these organizing committees.”

The weekend-long events will welcome thousands of spectators and fans to North Lake Tahoe. The entire community will play host to ski racing enthusiasts, aspiring young skiers and media from around the world. The event will be broadcast across America on NBC and NBCSN, and will be seen during primetime evening hours in Europe as well as across the globe, highlighting athletic talent and the Squaw Valley destination.

“From perfect bluebird days and adrenaline pumping trails to luxurious resorts and cool après ski vibes, winter in The Golden State is like nowhere else in the world,” said Visit California President & CEO Caroline Beteta. “The 2017 Alpine World Cup will put an international spotlight on one of California’s most majestic ski destinations and showcase the high altitude thrills and laid-back lifestyle that make for a snow experience that is uniquely Californian.”

All information about the 2017 World Cup at Squaw Valley, including information on schedule, tickets, media hosting, volunteering, venue and athletes will be hosted on WorldCupSquaw.com.
About Squaw Valley | Alpine Meadows
Voted 2016 ‘Best Ski Resort’ in North America by USA Today and 10Best Readers’ Choice, Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows is an internationally renowned mountain resort in North Lake Tahoe that spans over 6,000 skiable acres. The resort features slopeside lodging at The Village at Squaw Valley®, which bustles year round with nonstop events and nearly 60 bars, restaurants and boutiques. With an annual average of 450 inches of snowfall and 300 sunny days, Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows is known as the spring skiing capital as it provides one of the longest ski and snowboard seasons in Lake Tahoe. Over 65 percent beginner and intermediate terrain and 14 easy-to-navigate mountain zones welcome skiers and riders of all ability levels. Visit squawalpine.com or call 1.800.403.0206 to learn more.

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California lifts tough statewide water conservation rules

Marking a major shift in California water policy, state regulators Wednesday voted to lift the statewide conservation targets that for the past year have required dramatic cutbacks in irrigation and household water use for the Sacramento region and urban communities across the state.

The new rules adopted by the State Water Resources Control Board allow individual water agencies to propose their own conservation standards, based on the health of their water supplies and anticipated local demand.

The action effectively brings an end to an unprecedented conservation mandate, in place since June, that required urban water districts statewide to cut usage by an average of 25 percent over 2013. And it represents a sharp turn from the rhetoric of state officials for much of last year, when they warned that the drought represented a new reality that required permanent lifestyle changes and universal sacrifice.

See the Water Conservation Portal – Emergency Conservation Regulation for more information:http://www.waterboards.ca.gov/water_issues/programs/conservation_portal/emergency_regulation.shtml

Truckee / Lake Tahoe: Strong Ski Season Translates to Strong Real Estate Sales

Truckee Lake Tahoe Real Estate Statistics

SUMMARY

For the five months ended May 31, 2016 compared to 2015:

  • Single family homes transactions increased 14%, median prices increased 11%, and length of time on the market decreased 5%;
  • Condo transactions increased 27%, median prices increased 6%, and length of time on the market increased 13%;
  • Residential Lot transactions increased 21%, median prices increased 12%, and length of time on the market decreased 27%.

TREND

The best winter in four years has brought a substantial increase in ski area transactions & prices:

  • Squaw Valley is having a 5-fold increase in sales – 12 homes sold so far this year-to-date, compared to just 2 homes last year.  The median price is up significantly to $1,257,000 from $857,000, and time on the market has been cut in half.
  • Sales of homes in Northstar tripled so far this year compared to last – 16 homes this year vs. 4 homes last year, with median prices up 44% and days on the market decreased 33%!
  • Tahoe Donner also experienced transactional gains with sales up 25%, the median price up 9%, though days on the market were higher at 47 days from 39 days.
  • Our Tahoe Donner $/Sq. Ft. Index, where we compare similar 2500-3500 sq. ft. homes built between 2000-2010, is up 11% this year-to-date vs 2015 (see chart below).

Tahoe Donner $ per Sq. Ft.

 

Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows Celebrating Memorial Day with $150,000 Donation to High Fives Foundation for 2016-17 “Military to the Mountains” Program

OLYMPIC VALLEY, Calif. – May 30, 2016 – Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows commemorates Memorial Day and honors U.S. military veterans with a $150,000 donation to the High Fives Foundation as part of its “Military to the Mountains” program. The program, a partnership between Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows, High Fives Foundation, Achieve Tahoe (formerly Disabled Sports USA Far West) and Adaptive Training Foundation, hosts and trains injured veterans of the United States armed forces on the slopes of Squaw Valley. In the 2015-16 season, Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows contributed over $150,000 to the High Fives Foundation for the program and helped bring ten veterans from the Adaptive Training Foundation to the mountain to ski and snowboard for the first time in their lives. Funds generated from the 2015-16 program will enable the participation of 22 veterans in the 2016-17 “Military to the Mountains” program. Together with the High Fives Foundation, Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows will donate $22,000 of the total amount to 22Kill, a non-profit organization that combats Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) among service men and women.

“This Memorial Day Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows honors the U.S. military veterans who serve our country. We’re proud to present $150,000 to the High Fives Foundation to benefit veteran service men and women, with $22,000 going directly to 22Kill” said Andy Wirth, president and CEO of Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows. “The overwhelming success of this year’s first ‘Military to the Mountains’ program, and funds generated this season, will allow Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows, High Fives Foundation, and Achieve Tahoe to bring even more veterans from the Adaptive Training Foundation to Squaw Valley next season and support the program for years to come.”

As part of the “Military to the Mountains” program, Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows offered a complimentary 2015-16 Silver Tahoe Super Pass to all active-duty military personnel, along with a note of appreciation and a challenge coin in exchange for a donation of $25, of which all proceeds support non-profit organizations 22Kill and “Military to the Mountains.” To make a donation to the High Fives Foundation or to learn more about “Military to the Mountains”, visit HighFivesfoundation.org.

“High Fives Foundation is dedicated to improving the physical and emotional health of U.S. military veterans through the ‘Military to the Mountains’ program by providing resources and inspiration during their recovery,” said Roy Tuscany, executive director of High Fives Foundation. “Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows’ donation and partnership will allow us to continue our mission, and we look forward to welcoming the 22 veterans who will participate in the program next season.”

Created by the High Fives Foundation following the success veteran Marine Corporal Jacob (Jake) Schick achieved while skiing at Squaw Valley during the 2014-15 winter season, the “Military to the Mountains” program is collective effort between High Fives Foundation, Adaptive Training Foundation, Achieve Tahoe and Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows. The organizations successfully worked together to provide Schick with training prior to visiting Squaw Valley, and with adaptive skiing instruction once on the mountain, and will continue to do so for other injured military veterans.

The 2015-16 Military to the Mountains program began with a nine-week training class at the Dallas, TX based Adaptive Training Foundation, founded and operated by retired NFL linebacker, David Vobora. The mission of the Adaptive Training Foundation is to empower the human athlete, restore hope through movement, and redefine the limits of individuals with disabilities. Their role in this effort is to train military veterans who have been severely injured to be physically ready for adaptive skiing lessons. Following the nine-week training, High Fives and Adaptive Training Foundation brought the veterans to Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows, where they stayed and took to the slopes with Achieve Tahoe adaptive ski instructors.

For information about Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows, visit www.squawalpine.com.

About Squaw Valley | Alpine Meadows Voted 2016 ‘Best Ski Resort’ in North America by USA Today and 10Best Readers’ Choice, Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows is an internationally renowned mountain resort in North Lake Tahoe that spans over 6,000 skiable acres. The resort features slopeside lodging at The Village at Squaw Valley®, which bustles year round with nonstop events and nearly 60 bars, restaurants and boutiques. With an annual average of 450 inches of snowfall and 300 sunny days, Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows is known as the spring skiing capital as it provides one of the longest ski and snowboard seasons in Lake Tahoe. Over 65 percent beginner and intermediate terrain and 14 easy-to-navigate mountain zones welcome skiers and riders of all ability levels. Visit squawalpine.com or call 1.800.403.0206 to learn more.

About High Fives Foundation High Fives Non-Profit Foundation, based in Truckee, CA, became an official 501c.3 non-profit on January 19, 2009. Founded by Roy Tuscany, the Tahoe-based Foundation supports the dreams of mountain action sports athletes by raising injury prevention awareness while providing resources and inspiration to those who suffer life-altering injuries. For more information, visit www.highfivesfoundation.org.

About Achieve Tahoe Achieve Tahoe is a unique North Lake Tahoe-based non-profit organization, teaching specialized ski and snowboard lessons seven days a week on the slopes of Alpine Meadows, Squaw Valley and Northstar Resorts. Staffed by a corps of over 150 trained instructors, 90% of whom are volunteers, they serve people of any age with physical, sensory and intellectual challenges. Find out more at www.achievetahoe.org.

About Adaptive Training Foundation After meeting one of five living combat injured quadruple amputees, ATF Founder David Vobora recognized a void in the process to living an active and fulfilling life post injury. While there are many excellent rehabilitative programs and recreational adaptive sports organizations, none existed to bridge the gap from basic functional rehabilitation to adapted sport through individually customized performance training. It was out of this realization that ATF was conceived, and since receiving its official 501c.3 in late 2014, ATF has served over 50 athletes with varying disabilities. Learn more about ATF’s story at www.AdaptiveTrainingFoundation.org

 

Warm regards,
Andy Wirth
Chairman
Reno Tahoe Airport Authority Board of Trustees

President & Chairman
Regional Air Service Corporation

President & CEO
Squaw Valley Ski Holdings
Alpine Meadows | Squaw Valley

 

Truckee Fire Protection District Advises Wildfire Readiness

Are you getting ready for wildfire? Create defensible space around your property now! Free debris disposal.

 Soon the rain and cool weather will end and the grasses and brush will dry out quickly with the onset of fire season.  Even with the normal winter, years of drought has caused officials to predict that our area will experience a higher than average threat of a big wildfire later this summer.

You should take action now!  The wet weather has helped produce a large crop of grasses and brush that needs to be removed within 100″ of your house to reduce the risk of wildfire spreading to your house and other homes in your neighborhood.  Over 1700 homes were lost in the Butte and Valley fires last year.  Wildland fire remains the biggest threat of natural disaster in our community.

Disposing of Debris:

Burning yard debris.  Burning of small piles of debris in your yard is allowed in Truckee for a few more weeks.  Although you should check with your particular homeowners association to see if there are any restrictions in the HOA.  Stop by any fire station to get a FREE burn permit and to learn the specific rules.

Hire a defensible space contractor.  There are local companies that do defensible space work and haul off yard debris.

Take it to the Dump.  You can load up your truck and take it to the Eastern Regional Landfill FREE of charge.

Utilize the Green Bag Program.  Small amounts of yard debris can be placed in green bags and picked up in front of your house.

Get a 6 yard dumpster at your house for only $60.

Go to the Townoftruckee.com web site for more detailed information on yard waste disposal.  Call Truckee Fire at  582-7850 or stop by any fire station for more information or a FREE home defensible space inspection.

More defensible space tips at Readyforwildfire.org

Source: Truckee Fire Protection District

1st Quarter 2016 vs. 2015 Truckee / Lake Tahoe Statistics

Tahoe Donner Home Prices 2011 - 2016

Tahoe Donner Home Prices 2011 – 2016 based on 2500-3500 sq. ft. and built 2000-2010

 

Truckee / Lake Tahoe 1st qtr 2016 Real Estate Statistics

Truckee / Lake Tahoe 1st qtr. 2016 Real Estate Statistics compared to 1st qtr. 2015

SUMMARY

  • For the 1st quarter of 2016, 16% more homes were sold than the 1st quarter in 2015;
  • The median price for homes increased by 8.9%;
  • Overall, the median time homes were on the market was unchanged at 3-months;
  • A comparison of the similar homes sold in Tahoe Donner reveals the price per square foot rose approximately 8% in the 1st quarter of 2016 compared to 2015 (see graph).

Please call Scott Kennedy at (530) 448-3308, or email Scott@SierraTahoeRealty.com with any questions you may have.

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Schaffer’s Mill real estate for sale
 
 
 
 
NOTE: MLS data is believed accurate however not guaranteed – verification is recommended.

2015 vs 2014 Truckee / Lake Tahoe Statistical Report

Tahoe Donner Real Estate Statistics

Tahoe Donner Real Estate Statistics

Truckee / Lake Tahoe Real Estate Statistics - 2015 vs. 2014

SUMMARY
  • For 2015, 7% more homes were sold than in 2014 – however, ski resort sales (Alpine Meadows, Northstar & Squaw Valley) were 30-50% fewer due to less snow;
  • While the median price for homes decreased by $10,000 or 2%, it is a misleading statistic;
  • A comparison of the similar homes sold in Tahoe Donner reveals the price per square foot rose approximately 5% in 2015 compared to 2014 (see graph).
  • Condo sales in Tahoe Donner provide the best indicator of overall change in valuation, as neighborhood statistics in other areas can be skewed by higher or lower price-points – an example being the Westshore which is skewed greatly by $2-$3 million condos in Fleur du Lac.
Feel free to call or email Scott Kennedy with any questions you may have.
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NOTE: Tahoe Donner $ / sq. ft. data based on subset of homes 2500-3500 sq. ft. built between 2000-2010.  MLS data is believed accurate however not guaranteed – verification is recommended.